Tag Archives: World War II

The Roundup #61

As America marches slowly towards its demise, I would compare it to the evacuation at Dunkirk in 1940, but that would be rude. Although, one could say that neither group really knew what they were getting in to until they got there and realized that they’re fucked.

But the archaeological world continues to trudge along, hunting for grant funding, and work permits in countries where most people are worried about getting shot. So here’s this week’s roundup. Enjoy!

From Archaeology.org:

A toy discovered in 1890 is helping archaeologists understand how chariots were designed in the Roman world.

A cistern used as a food storage facility has been discovered during construction in London, England.

Evidence of long-distance trade has been identified from stone tools and flint unearthed during construction work in St. Andrews, Scotland.

The earliest evidence of silk production yet discovered has been identified in Henan province, China.

Delays in studying the site at Oahu where the Attack on Pearl Harbor occurred continue to generate questions about the events and the site itself.

From the Guardian:

Plans are in place to dig a traffic tunnel underneath Stonehenge, ostensibly to relieve traffic congestion around the site, while archaeologists and historians are decrying the vandalization of the remarkable site.

And a curator of the Folger Shakespeare Library has found definitive proof among research on the Elizabethan College of Heralds that Shakespeare the player is also Shakespeare from Stratford who tried to apply for a coat of arms through the College in the 16th century.

The Roundup #33

And here’s my roundup from the week of March 21st to 28th inclusive. I don’t know about you, but I’m certainly looking forward to being back up to date.

The highlight of this week was that Syrian forces retook Palmyra from Daesh which, I’m sure, has anxious archaeologists desperate to get out there and survey the damage.

From Archaeology.org:

A ‘house of the dead‘ – a building that collapsed and was made into a burial chamber – has been discovered in the United Arab Emirates.

This feature looks at the ongoing archaeological work at Kaminaljuyu, a massive metropolis in Guatemala.

Butchered brown bear bones – something that won’t ever make it into an alphabet book for kids – have proven that Ireland was inhabited 2500 years earlier than previously thought.

From the Smithsonian:

An absolutely fascinating museum project in Poland, where children from 6 to 14 curated the show, demonstrates the value of a fresh pair of eyes (among other things).

A tiny gold crucifix found in Denmark suggests that Christianity came to the Vikings earlier than previously thought.

In History Today:

A feature on the strange life of Pontius Pilate.

In LiveScience:

A stunning find – a lavish apartment in the villa complex at Tivoli – includes colourful mosaics and other decorations. This one I’m going to keep my eye on.

From the Guardian:

Two German warships have been discovered in Portsmouth Harbour, near where King Henry VIII’s ship Mary Rose was recently discovered. Makes you wonder what else is down there…

And from the University of Cincinnati:

Work is ongoing at the site of a recently discovered Bronze Age warrior’s tomb in southern Greece.

The Roundup #11

Another slightly late post, due entirely to the fact that there was art to consider, people to meet, and beer to be drunk on a Saturday night in Toronto.

It was sad to be greeted this morning with news of the death of Dr. Oliver Sacks. This preeminent neurologist and writer seems to have been unique among men in that he took great joy in his life, in all aspects of it. Such delight will be missed, no doubt.

News also of the ongoing humanitarian crisis as people migrating to Europe from Syria, the Middle East, and Africa reminds me of the human migrations of the last two thousand years, particularly the migration across what is now Switzerland that offered Caesar an unmissable opportunity for political advancement.

My personal favourite from this week’s news has to be this beautiful, enigmatic mask from Alaska, a face with both human and walrus attributes.

And now, for this week’s roundup:

In History Online:

Helen Roche offers an interesting theory about the origins of the animosity between Germany and Greece.

From Archaeology.org:

The use of Egyptian blue paint has been discovered on Roman-era funerary portraits. More on what is considered the world’s oldest artificial pigment here.

All the modern amenities: specific sleeping areas and a hearth space that may have been used to heat water have been discovered for the first time at a Neanderthal site in Spain.

Jeffrey Schwartz of the University of Pittsburgh is proposing that researchers develop a new morphology for classifying hominids.

A Polish Soviet World War II plane has been discovered in Bzura Lake following record heat and a lack of rainfall in the region. Attempts to identify the plane and its unfortunately pilot are ongoing.

More Linear B tablets from this remarkable find – a Mycenaean palace complex in Laconia.

And a mysterious collection of ice age lion and bear bones have been discovered in a cave in Russia.

From The Walrus:

Alexander Tesar takes us into the world of the Archaeological Services Inc based in Toronto and Burlington, Ontario.

From the office of the Mayor of Chicago:

Three Japanese sliding door panels have been rediscovered in a storage facility. Originally displayed during the 1893 World’s Fair, these panels will undergo conservation efforts while the local government determines their fate as part of Chicago’s rich heritage.

From Biblical Archaeology:

The House of Peter in Capernaum where Jesus lived during the early part of his ministrations may have been discovered under a Byzantine church.

And a feature on the great temple of Megiddo and urban culture in the Levant.

The Roundup #9

It’s been a hell of a week for editorial cartoonists in Canada. One day, these will be part of the archaeological work of some great doctoral student.

In the meantime, work is underway to explore the possibility that the Egyptian Queen Nefertiti, wife of Akenaten and possibly pharaoh in her own right, may have been buried in a series of rooms off the small burial space of King Tut himself. Archaeology.org and the BBC have reported on it, as well as, surprisingly enough, The Economist (this article includes details on the theory postulated by Nicholas Reeves). I expect there will be more articles with the famous bust of Nefertiti, on display at the Neues Museum in Berlin, as the lead photo in the days and weeks and months to come. One thing I’d like to know: why would the ancient Egyptians have wanted to hide her burial chambers?

However, the highlight of the week for me personally was this article on the 6th century BCE sanctuary discovered on the Palatine in Rome. I’ve wandered past dig sites there that were cordoned off from public dalliance, and imagined the wonders beneath the hill ever since the first images were broadcast during initial tests of an area now called the Lupercal.

And with that, here’s this week’s roundup.

From the Beeb:

Archaeologists and scholars are working to decipher a series of inscriptions from a mikveh in Israel. I’m not sure if this is the same ritual bath that was discovered by accident during home renovations, but I’ll be interested to see what ultimately comes of this.

From the Smithsonian:

A feature discusses the viability of tomb raiding in China (and, by extension, elsewhere).

Evidence shows that teenage girls have been language disruptors since at least Shakespeare’s day. Like, totes!

And the oldest existing colour illustrated printed book – a 1633 volume of a Manual on Calligraphy and Painting – has been digitized to both protect the original and to allow for further study. Check out what else was recently digitized using this remarkable new technique!

From Archaeology.org:

Work continues at a site in Denmark believed to be a Neolithic sun temple complex.

In the first of three shipwreck stories, a gun carriage from The London has been brought to the surface. This ship carried Charles II from the Netherlands in 1660 to restore the monarchy in England, and then exploded five years later when the explosives it was carrying ignited.

The bell from the HMS Hoodthe British flagship destroyer that was sunk by the Bismarck in the Denmark Strait in 1941 with the loss of all but three of over 1,400 lives, has been raised and will become part of a memorial at the National Museum of the Royal Navy.

And finally, the mystery of one of the cargo ships of the 19th century Baron de Rothschild may have been solved with the discovery of a ship of similar description off the coast of Israel.

Restoration work is underway to maintain the breathtaking Domus Aurea of Nero in Rome.

And a plague pit from the 17th century has been discovered during construction of the new high-speed Crossrail in England near Liverpool Street Station. To demonstrate the extreme nature of the epidemic that affected England at this time, The Guardian has created an interactive map of the plague victims uncovered during this construction project.