The Roundup #55

It’s been one hell of a couple weeks. Donald Trump was elected President of the United States, Leonard Cohen died, and I now know what’s left of a body after it’s hit by a train. All fun stuff, you can imagine.

During the Mosul offensive in Iraq, it appears that ISIS/ISIL/Daesh have made efforts to destroy anything in their path as they retreat, including more of the ancient site of Nimrud in the north. Reuters has reported on it, as has the Smithsonian – specifically regarding the ziggurat destroyed there – and History Today offers a retrospective on the city for those hoping to learn more.

So, as a respite, here is the roundup from the last two weeks. Enjoy!

From Archaeology.org:

Otzi the Ice Man’s outfit was assembled from five different animal species, suggesting there was more going on than straight-up subsistence living.

Would you like a crocodile mummy? Why not 50 for the price of one? New evidence shows that a crocodile mummy actually contains the mummies of 47 hatchlings as well, folded into the wrappings of the larger animal.

Does anyone remember the scavenger-doctor character Tom Hanks played in Cloud Atlas? Hunting around for real teeth for dentures wasn’t made up, as these from Tuscany and suggest.

A possible site for the final resting place of the last emperor of the Inca may be on the table, after archaeologists began excavating at Maiqui-Machay in Ecuador.

An odd thing: a pot from a Roman camp site in Switzerland containing oil lamps with images of Luna, gladiators, peacocks, and other figures.

Archaeologists working at a site in Kazakhstan have unearthed stone structures containing a variety of treasures suggesting that the people living here were wealthy as well as originally nomadic.

Mosaic floors found in Turkey! Need I say more?

Hundreds of graves for monks have been discovered at Fountains Abbey in North Yorkshire.

A feature on an Islamic palace found near Jericho.

Petroglyphs in Hawaii were uncovered after shifting sand revealed them in July.

A burial causeway in Aswan dating to the 12th dynasty has been discovered in Egypt.

Evidence of a mythical flood that ushered in the Xia dynasty in China has been discovered.

Shakespeare’s Curtain Theatre is currently being excavated in London. Of the many items discovered there are ticket boxes and parts of costumes.

And ongoing excavations at Tel Gezer in Israel are revealing some stunning finds.

The Roundup #37

It’s been a crazy month, but it looks like spring has finally (FINALLY!) sprung in Toronto. Hard to stay inside when the sun’s out and the sky’s blue, but there’s lots going on in the world of archaeology, so here’s this week’s roundup. Enjoy!

From the Manchester Evening News:

On the site of a new tower block in Manchester, archaeologists have found the remnants of a pub – the Astley Arms – from 1821, including a few bottles of unopened brandy.

From the New York Times:

Perhaps one of the most spectacular finds in England in the last decade, a lavish Roman villa from the 2nd or 3rd century AD was discovered when a local homeowner decided to run cabling from his house to a shed at the back of his property so his son could have light to play table tennis.

From the Smithsonian:

An extremely well preserved dress from the 17th century has been found in a shipwreck off the coast of the Netherlands.

From Archaeology.org:

A remarkably well preserved Roman wall has been discovered in Bulgaria.

Cheese making may be older than originally thought, following the discovery of clay pots in the Swiss Alps showing that they were used to heat milk.

Climate change may have impacted the weather – and therefore also the growing seasons – in the Northern Hemisphere in the 6th century AD.

The Roundup #7

What a find! The oldest known Roman fortifications, and the only ones ever discovered in Italy, have been identified near Trieste.

Archaeology Magazine does a slightly more in-depth piece on Carnuntum in Austria, a Roman fort along the Danube that became a thriving city until it was abandoned in the 5th century CE. Among other things, evidence of a gladiatorial school has been discovered there and archaeological work is ongoing.

And a bizarre site where excavators have found bison bones buried deep in the earth has University of Lethbridge archaeologists scratching their heads.

Here’s this week’s roundup, albeit a day later than usual:

In Archaeology.org:

Proof that, when it comes to archaeology, details are everything, archaeologists at Tel-Kabri are examining recently excavated jars, some of which used to contain an aromatic red wine.

The oldest known Pictish fort has been identified in Dunnicaer by archaeologists from the University of Aberdeen in Scotland.

Preliminary surveys of the site of the Great Synagogue of Vilna in Lithuania have led to discussion about excavations in coming seasons.

Potentially the oldest human remains yet found in France, a human tooth has been discovered during excavations in Arago Cave in the southwestern part of the country.

And your bit of cuteness for the week, cat paw prints have been discovered on Roman roof tiles from England.

From PastHorizons:

A Roman military bath complex has been discovered in Georgia, complete with decorative mosaics. Luxury flooring for army men? This is something I’ll keep tabs on…

From the Smithsonian:

The Jamestown Rediscovery has another medal for its mantlepiece: the identities of four of the senior members of the original 17th century colony.

From The Guardian:

A Russian submarine has been discovered off the coast of Sweden. Although it’s still unclear how old the sub actually is, one this is certain: we won’t find Sean Connery in it.