The Roundup #72

It’s been a week of finding things, including some rather joy-inducing Canadian things. Here’s this week’s roundup. Enjoy!

From the CBC:

Two of the nine prototypes of the Avro Arrow, Canada’s first and only supersonic interceptor, have been discovered at the bottom of Lake Ontario. Kraken Sonar is looking to retrieve all nine models to coincide with the 60th anniversary of the first test flight for a program abruptly scrapped by Ottawa in 1959.

Two ships – a wooden freighter and a steel-hulled steamer that sank 20 years apart – have been discovered in Lake Huron.

From Archaeology.org:

Another well-preserved shipwreck, this one in Stockholm, Sweden, may be the Scepter, archaeologists say.

23,000 year old artifacts from an inland site have been discovered in Brazil.

Fragments of small votive objects have been discovered in Lebanon, leading archaeologists to believe that the Phoenicians may have manufactured disposable figurines of divinities.

Neapolis, possibly the largest centre for the production of the infamous Roman fish sauce called garum has been discovered at an underwater site off the coast of Tunisia.

From the Smithsonian:

The earliest known Latin commentaries on the Bible, lost until 2012, have been translated into English and are now available online.

Palimpsests containing not only a variety of manuscript texts but also a variety of languages, some obscure and defunct, have been discovered during research at St. Catherine’s monastery near Mount Sinai.

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The Roundup #54

Just a few days until the American election and the anti-Trump/anti-Clinton rhetoric is beyond exhausting. As Obama says: “Don’t boo. Vote.” And as one of the mother’s in Titanic said, “It’ll all be over soon.”

So without further ado, here’s this week’s roundup. Enjoy!

From Archaeology.org:

Osteologists report that they may have found the remains of Amelia Earhart (again, some more) after examining the records of bones (rather than the bones themselves, which have been lost) discovered on a remote island in Kiribati.

Evidence from caves in Ethiopia suggest a more ubiquitous use of ochre throughout the Middle Stone Age.

A remarkably well-preserved shipwreck has been discovered in shallow waters off the Aland Islands in Finland.

Ostrich eggshell beads of incredible craftsmanship have been discovered in Siberia.

A Phoenician shipwreck off the coast of Malta has yielded more information on local and international trade in the area.

A massive find: a hippodrome mosaic has been discovered in Cyprus, one of less than 10 on the subject so far unearthed.