Tag Archives: Pearl Harbor

The Roundup #61

As America marches slowly towards its demise, I would compare it to the evacuation at Dunkirk in 1940, but that would be rude. Although, one could say that neither group really knew what they were getting in to until they got there and realized that they’re fucked.

But the archaeological world continues to trudge along, hunting for grant funding, and work permits in countries where most people are worried about getting shot. So here’s this week’s roundup. Enjoy!

From Archaeology.org:

A toy discovered in 1890 is helping archaeologists understand how chariots were designed in the Roman world.

A cistern used as a food storage facility has been discovered during construction in London, England.

Evidence of long-distance trade has been identified from stone tools and flint unearthed during construction work in St. Andrews, Scotland.

The earliest evidence of silk production yet discovered has been identified in Henan province, China.

Delays in studying the site at Oahu where the Attack on Pearl Harbor occurred continue to generate questions about the events and the site itself.

From the Guardian:

Plans are in place to dig a traffic tunnel underneath Stonehenge, ostensibly to relieve traffic congestion around the site, while archaeologists and historians are decrying the vandalization of the remarkable site.

And a curator of the Folger Shakespeare Library has found definitive proof among research on the Elizabethan College of Heralds that Shakespeare the player is also Shakespeare from Stratford who tried to apply for a coat of arms through the College in the 16th century.