Tag Archives: Horses

The Roundup #62

The world may not have ended on Friday with the inauguration of Idiot Boy, but it sure feels like it did. “Alternative facts” are now a thing (I guess we’ve moved on from #fakenews because the new Administration doesn’t yet have control of the media). On Saturday, something like three million people marched in protest across all seven continents (yes, there were even people in Antarctica protesting the sorry state of affairs in the US right now), and that gave hope to a large number of people who do really feel the world they know may be coming to an end.

In other news, ISIS/ISIL/Daesh/The Islamic State destroyed the Tetrapylon in Palmyra after retaking part of the city. And a couple of idiots tried to sneak in to the Colosseum and fell four meters.

Otherwise, here’s this week’s roundup. Enjoy!

From Archaeology.org:

The skeleton of a horse has been discovered near the Colosseum in Rome, likely dating from the High Middle Ages.

At a hill fort excavation in southern Scotland, archaeologists feel they may have identified the royal seat of the ancient kingdom of Rheged.

A fortified gatehouse at the entrance to a copper mine has been discovered in Israel.

An inscribed pendant has been discovered at Sobibor extermination camp in Poland.

An unusual stone found in Croatia may have been kept as a curiosity by Neanderthals living there at the time.

From the CBC:

Evidence from the Bluefish Caves in Yukon Territory in Canada may reveal the site to be the oldest in North America.

The Roundup #54

Just a few days until the American election and the anti-Trump/anti-Clinton rhetoric is beyond exhausting. As Obama says: “Don’t boo. Vote.” And as one of the mother’s in Titanic said, “It’ll all be over soon.”

So without further ado, here’s this week’s roundup. Enjoy!

From Archaeology.org:

Osteologists report that they may have found the remains of Amelia Earhart (again, some more) after examining the records of bones (rather than the bones themselves, which have been lost) discovered on a remote island in Kiribati.

Evidence from caves in Ethiopia suggest a more ubiquitous use of ochre throughout the Middle Stone Age.

A remarkably well-preserved shipwreck has been discovered in shallow waters off the Aland Islands in Finland.

Ostrich eggshell beads of incredible craftsmanship have been discovered in Siberia.

A Phoenician shipwreck off the coast of Malta has yielded more information on local and international trade in the area.

A massive find: a hippodrome mosaic has been discovered in Cyprus, one of less than 10 on the subject so far unearthed.

The Roundup #48

The 2016 Olympics in Rio are well underway and people are discovering all kinds of sports they didn’t know they enjoyed watching, like rugby sevens apparently. And, in spite of the volcanic heat in Toronto, things are happening all over the world. My favourite of the week  has to be this note in the Washington Post about a massive mosaic depicting chariot racing discovered in Cyprus.

So, without further ado, here’s this week’s roundup. Enjoy!

From Archaeology.org:

Massive structures have been found near Risan, Montenegro dating to the third century BCE. Risan is the capital of ancient Illyria.

Healthy living isn’t a new fad, as the discovery of a plunge pool built in the 19th century inside a 12th century abbey proves.

Evidence from horses that died in the Middle Ages suggests that the elusive ‘ambling’ gait originated in Medieval England.

Fragments of Roman fresco discovered in Israel may have been part of a public building constructed in the second century CE.

Ongoing archaeological work around the site of Tintagel in Cornwall is providing new information on the date of the first settlements there.

From the Smithsonian:

The oldest known processed gold has been discovered in Bulgaria.

Evidence of the mysterious snake-head dynasty have been discovered in Belize.

From the Independent:

At first blush, the news that a Portuguese sailing ship has been discovered in a Namibian desert might sound outlandish (sorry, bad pun), but this is apparently not that unusual: the latest is the Bom Jesus, that set sail in 1533 and vanished with its crew and cargo on its way to India.

From the Guardian:

A unique find during the excavation of a burial site in Serbia: magic spells inscribed on gold leaf found with skeletons as amulets.

From History Today:

A feature on the largest pyramid in the world – and it’s not in Egypt, but in Mexico: the Great Pyramid of Cholula.

The Roundup #27

It’s been an exciting week in the world of archaeology. A Roman arcade has been discovered in Colchester near the Temple of Claudius. It was known to historians previously, having been built in the city in the wake of its destruction during Boudicca’s revolt in 60-61 AD, but it was while the city was replacing an old tower block that it finally came to light.

And, elsewhere in the world, for this week’s roundup…

From Archaeology.org:

The remains from two Roman burial sites may be of individuals from North Africa and Asia, yet another example of the ongoing migratory nature of humans throughout history.

What have the Romans ever done for us? Well, in Northern England, surveyors using systems designed to watch for flooding have discovered Roman roads built during the conquest of the northern part of the island.

First we have Canadians curling an injured animal off the ice (typical), and now we have a badger discovering a Bronze Age burial site near Stonehenge in England.

An in-depth study of ancient silver mines in Greece have brought to light the terrible conditions suffered by those who worked in the mines, most of whom were slaves.

And studies suggest that horses can intuit human emotion as a result of their early domestication.

From the Smithsonian:

Some of the oldest tea ever discovered has been found in the tomb of Han Emperor Jing Di over two thousand years ago.

And, if you’re looking for something to haunt your dreams, try this.

 

And finally, I’m partial to following the work done at Gezer because I had a peripheral role in collating and preparing the data from one dig season while working at the Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations Department at the University of Toronto.

 

The Roundup #25

Lots of dead animals and decapitations this time around for some reason. I leave it to you to determine what if any significance that might have…

From Archaeology.org:

Evidence of sacrifice in the area around Aarhus in Denmark is being described as “not normal” after a site where a woman was decapitated and buried in a bog with eight dogs is discovered in an area resplendent for its bog burials.

An incredibly well-preserved skeleton of a horse – complete with its hooves – has been discovered in a necropolis at Faliro, outside of Athens, Greece.

Genome sequencing of seven skeletons from a cemetery in northern England attests to the cosmopolitan nature of the Roman Empire. The Guardian has also reported on this.

It appears that, approximately 10,000 years ago, a group of people were massacred on the shores of Lake Turkana in Kenya.

France has returned the head of a Khmer statue to be reunited with the body at Cambodia’s National Museum after 125 years in the Guimet Museum.

From the Smithsonian:

There are always people in history who are endlessly fascinated and intricately connected to the world they lived in and the way we understand our world now. One of these, John Dee, advisor and astrologer to Queen Elizabeth I of England, is the subject of this article and of a Victorian-era painting of him by Henry Gilland Glindoni.

From the Portland Press Herald:

The place where 19 people were hanged during the Salem Witch Trials in the late 17th century have been formally identified using ground penetrating radar

The Roundup #22

So I vanished for a few weeks. Netflix released their new series Jessica Jones. What was I to do? Just ignore that fact and forge ahead? Nope.

Here’s a roundup from the last two weeks. It’s been relatively quiet… Like the archaeological world knew I’d be distracted by dark Marvel storytelling…

From Archaeology.org:

Uniqueness will always be celebrated, even when that celebration is a sacrifice and entombment, as has been discovered in northern China where a golden or palomino horse was buried with its owner.

Evidence of sewing machines from San Francisco’s chinatown destroyed in the earthquake of 1906 have revived research into the city’s 19th century past.

A massive Bronze Age settlement has been discovered in Scotland.

I feel like I’ve heard about this before, but aerial mapping of the site of Angkor Wat shows that the complex is much larger than originally thought.

A 12th century castle has been discovered under the exercise yard of Gloucester Prison which closed in 2013.

Sicily’s Valley of the Temples is being surveyed, showing that these large structures were aligned with major thoroughfares and constellations in the sky.

From The Guardian:

Archaeologists believe they have discovered the tomb of Suleiman The Magnificent, the longest ruling sultan of the Ottoman Empire, in Hungary.

The Roundup #3

There were a good many things in the news this week that were archaeologically relevant and/or just wonderful tidbits to read. I had trouble narrowing down my favourites but here they are, along with the usual roundup of everything I felt worth sharing on the Book of Faces.

My favourite, upon reflection, has got to be this delightful find from Vindolanda in northern England. Kids will step in the darndest things!

There’s also this incredible project of digitizing African rock art into a vast database.

And I was enamoured with this survey piece on horses in sport and spectacle.

From the Guardian:

Archaeology of the future began in the past, as Coleen Jose, Kim Wall, and Jan Hendrik Hinzel report on the implications of nuclear waste in The Tomb at Enewetak Atoll.

The ongoing issue of looted artefacts and museums is the subject of this article by Guardian reporter Khanishk Tharoor.

From Archaeology.org:

Daily life gets the spotlight in a series of new excavations at Angkor Wat.

If you were looking for a reason to visit Tuscany, here’s one (with a link to the recent reopening of the House of the Chaste Lovers in Pompeii at the bottom).

Renovations are always interesting but this one in Israel particularly so.

Paleolithic milk-based paints have been confirmed in South Africa, before the domestication of bovids.

A prehistoric village on the remote Pacific island of Guam has been discovered by archaeologist from the University of Guam.

I’m glad I wasn’t the archaeologist who first spotted these relics from a dig in New Zealand. They would have given me nightmares.

And our repatriation story for the week, an 11th century statue of the Tamil poet Manikkavichavakar is being returned to India.

From GlobalVoicesOnline:

Language activists in Colombia are gathering to support cultural and linguistic diversity.

From JSTOR Daily:

1752 was one hell of a leap year, with Britain and her colonies adding 11 days all at once to come into alignment with the Gregorian calendar used by the rest of Europe. What a week (and a bit) that must have been.

The Roundup #2

A day late but hopefully not a dollar short (unless you’re the Greek government), here’s the second installation of my weekly roundup.

My favourite has to be the discovery of a piece of marble depicting a dolphin in Israel. Running in close second is this article on weapons of mass destruction from the Ancient world.

Archaeology.org was at the top of their game, news-wise this week:

A wreck off the coast of Italy has been discovered, heavily laden with Roman roof tiles still packed tightly in the hold of the ship.

Archaeologists theorize that two graves from a Greek settlement that seemed ‘peculiar’ are actually zombie burials.

Archaeological work at the Antikythera site will be funded for another five years, a triumph in an age of such austerity.

A bronze age settlement in England that appears to have been destroyed by fire will also continue to be excavated.

And the former home of Lady Jane Grey, England’s Nine Days Queen, is yielding a trove of artefacts from across the ages.

From the Smithsonian:

Recycling makes for delightful finds as one art lover discovered after purchasing what he thought were two pastels by French Impressionist Claude Monet.

And a Peruvian road regularly travelled is still a wonder to those who set foot on it.

From Biblical Archaeology:

Take a look at the toolkit of one of the archaeologists excavating at Huqoq.

 

The eeriest piece of the week has to be this one from the Guardian detailing the largest single collection of Nazi memorabilia in the world, tucked away in Leicestershire.

And more sad news from Palmyra as the destruction of the UNESCO World Heritage Site by the Islamic State continues.