The Roundup #62

The world may not have ended on Friday with the inauguration of Idiot Boy, but it sure feels like it did. “Alternative facts” are now a thing (I guess we’ve moved on from #fakenews because the new Administration doesn’t yet have control of the media). On Saturday, something like three million people marched in protest across all seven continents (yes, there were even people in Antarctica protesting the sorry state of affairs in the US right now), and that gave hope to a large number of people who do really feel the world they know may be coming to an end.

In other news, ISIS/ISIL/Daesh/The Islamic State destroyed the Tetrapylon in Palmyra after retaking part of the city. And a couple of idiots tried to sneak in to the Colosseum and fell four meters.

Otherwise, here’s this week’s roundup. Enjoy!

From Archaeology.org:

The skeleton of a horse has been discovered near the Colosseum in Rome, likely dating from the High Middle Ages.

At a hill fort excavation in southern Scotland, archaeologists feel they may have identified the royal seat of the ancient kingdom of Rheged.

A fortified gatehouse at the entrance to a copper mine has been discovered in Israel.

An inscribed pendant has been discovered at Sobibor extermination camp in Poland.

An unusual stone found in Croatia may have been kept as a curiosity by Neanderthals living there at the time.

From the CBC:

Evidence from the Bluefish Caves in Yukon Territory in Canada may reveal the site to be the oldest in North America.

The Roundup #41

In typical fashion, I got distracted by the world these last few days, as I sorted out my life (as much of it as I felt was necessary, at any rate), and enjoyed the first hot days of summer here in Toronto (feels like the first time I’ve been warm in eight months, suggesting a rather neat affinity to Sam McGee, if I do say so myself).

My favourite bit of news has to be these Roman tablets from Britain, possibly the oldest ever recovered, including the first known reference to London, and first known dated document, which are going on display in London.

So here’s my roundup from the last three weeks. Enjoy!

From Archaeology.org:

Cave art has been found nearly 1,000 feet down in Basque country in Spain, including what looks like an image of a bison pierced with a lot of spears.

Crappy weather does more than make me miserable; it may have been responsible for the withdrawal of the Mongols from Europe in the 13th century.

The history of language – a favourite topic of mine – has further notes, as a cuneiform tablet from the first century AD is so far the most recent example of a written language whose spoken counterpart appears to have died out hundreds of years earlier.

I feel like I’ve seen this argument somewhere before, but here’s a neat bit of work out of Australia on the similarities between horns from southern India and those from the ancient Mediterranean.

An archaeologist’s dream – a site containing such a myriad of artefacts that it’s a never ending processing of cataloguing and interpretation – this site in southern Mexico includes a carved human jaw bone. Fascinating!

And I may have already posted this, but it’s worth a second look: a rich shipwreck has been discovered in the old harbour of Caesarea.

From the CBC:

King Tut’s ceremonial dagger appears to be made of meteorite. Because it’s good to be the king.

From The Atlantic:

Modern archaeology gets meta as researchers have discovered jewellery hidden in the false bottom of a cup left behind at Auschwitz.

And from History Today:

Considerations on the use of the phrase ‘dark ages’ in British history, particularly as it relates to the remarkable┬ásite of Tintagel in Cornwall, long believed to be where the mythical King Arthur was conceived after Merlin magicked Uther Pendragon inside the castle and into the lady Ygraine’s bed.