Tag Archives: Gezer

The Roundup #55

It’s been one hell of a couple weeks. Donald Trump was elected President of the United States, Leonard Cohen died, and I now know what’s left of a body after it’s hit by a train. All fun stuff, you can imagine.

During the Mosul offensive in Iraq, it appears that ISIS/ISIL/Daesh have made efforts to destroy anything in their path as they retreat, including more of the ancient site of Nimrud in the north. Reuters has reported on it, as has the Smithsonian – specifically regarding the ziggurat destroyed there – and History Today offers a retrospective on the city for those hoping to learn more.

So, as a respite, here is the roundup from the last two weeks. Enjoy!

From Archaeology.org:

Otzi the Ice Man’s outfit was assembled from five different animal species, suggesting there was more going on than straight-up subsistence living.

Would you like a crocodile mummy? Why not 50 for the price of one? New evidence shows that a crocodile mummy actually contains the mummies of 47 hatchlings as well, folded into the wrappings of the larger animal.

Does anyone remember the scavenger-doctor character Tom Hanks played in Cloud Atlas? Hunting around for real teeth for dentures wasn’t made up, as these from Tuscany and suggest.

A possible site for the final resting place of the last emperor of the Inca may be on the table, after archaeologists began excavating at Maiqui-Machay in Ecuador.

An odd thing: a pot from a Roman camp site in Switzerland containing oil lamps with images of Luna, gladiators, peacocks, and other figures.

Archaeologists working at a site in Kazakhstan have unearthed stone structures containing a variety of treasures suggesting that the people living here were wealthy as well as originally nomadic.

Mosaic floors found in Turkey! Need I say more?

Hundreds of graves for monks have been discovered at Fountains Abbey in North Yorkshire.

A feature on an Islamic palace found near Jericho.

Petroglyphs in Hawaii were uncovered after shifting sand revealed them in July.

A burial causeway in Aswan dating to the 12th dynasty has been discovered in Egypt.

Evidence of a mythical flood that ushered in the Xia dynasty in China has been discovered.

Shakespeare’s Curtain Theatre is currently being excavated in London. Of the many items discovered there are ticket boxes and parts of costumes.

And ongoing excavations at Tel Gezer in Israel are revealing some stunning finds.

The Roundup #27

It’s been an exciting week in the world of archaeology. A Roman arcade has been discovered in Colchester near the Temple of Claudius. It was known to historians previously, having been built in the city in the wake of its destruction during Boudicca’s revolt in 60-61 AD, but it was while the city was replacing an old tower block that it finally came to light.

And, elsewhere in the world, for this week’s roundup…

From Archaeology.org:

The remains from two Roman burial sites may be of individuals from North Africa and Asia, yet another example of the ongoing migratory nature of humans throughout history.

What have the Romans ever done for us? Well, in Northern England, surveyors using systems designed to watch for flooding have discovered Roman roads built during the conquest of the northern part of the island.

First we have Canadians curling an injured animal off the ice (typical), and now we have a badger discovering a Bronze Age burial site near Stonehenge in England.

An in-depth study of ancient silver mines in Greece have brought to light the terrible conditions suffered by those who worked in the mines, most of whom were slaves.

And studies suggest that horses can intuit human emotion as a result of their early domestication.

From the Smithsonian:

Some of the oldest tea ever discovered has been found in the tomb of Han Emperor Jing Di over two thousand years ago.

And, if you’re looking for something to haunt your dreams, try this.

 

And finally, I’m partial to following the work done at Gezer because I had a peripheral role in collating and preparing the data from one dig season while working at the Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations Department at the University of Toronto.