Tag Archives: food

The Roundup #61

As America marches slowly towards its demise, I would compare it to the evacuation at Dunkirk in 1940, but that would be rude. Although, one could say that neither group really knew what they were getting in to until they got there and realized that they’re fucked.

But the archaeological world continues to trudge along, hunting for grant funding, and work permits in countries where most people are worried about getting shot. So here’s this week’s roundup. Enjoy!

From Archaeology.org:

A toy discovered in 1890 is helping archaeologists understand how chariots were designed in the Roman world.

A cistern used as a food storage facility has been discovered during construction in London, England.

Evidence of long-distance trade has been identified from stone tools and flint unearthed during construction work in St. Andrews, Scotland.

The earliest evidence of silk production yet discovered has been identified in Henan province, China.

Delays in studying the site at Oahu where the Attack on Pearl Harbor occurred continue to generate questions about the events and the site itself.

From the Guardian:

Plans are in place to dig a traffic tunnel underneath Stonehenge, ostensibly to relieve traffic congestion around the site, while archaeologists and historians are decrying the vandalization of the remarkable site.

And a curator of the Folger Shakespeare Library has found definitive proof among research on the Elizabethan College of Heralds that Shakespeare the player is also Shakespeare from Stratford who tried to apply for a coat of arms through the College in the 16th century.

The Roundup #19 and #20

Dear Readers, I’ve been remiss. Somehow I managed to entirely forget about posting a roundup last weekend, so this weekend – as I did a bit ago when I was away – I’ll post two. Roundup #19 will cover the week beginning November 2nd, and #20 will cover this past week beginning November 9th.

On November 7th, Sierra Leone was officially declared ebola-free, something that the WHO and Medecins sans Frontieres must be absolutely joyous about, let alone the people of Sierra Leone themselves.

Otherwise, the week of November 2nd was relatively quiet. Here goes Roundup #19:

From the Guardian:

Burial vaults are being discovered – or, rather, rediscovered – in New York City (Greenwich Village and Washington Square Park). They are approximately 200 years old themselves, and were at one point discovered by ConEdison in the 1960s, before offering archaeologists this week the chance to re-discover them.

A leather trunk in The Hague contains undelivered letters from nearly 300 years ago, including a sad plea from a woman – likely in a compromising situation – to the man who helped get there in that position. Archaeologists and social historians are agog.

And, in an update from the story about the Nazi gold train in Poland, members of the Krakow mining academy will begin surveys this week to determine just what is down there.

 

And here goes Roundup #20.

This week, the news that India was planning to launch a bid to have the Koh-i Noor diamond – currently the centrepiece of the British Crown Jewels – to be returned to them, fomenting debate once again about the repatriation of artworks and cultural treasures. History Today reissued an article written in the 1970s about the history of the diamond.

From Archaeology.org:

A Neolithic smoke house has been discovered in Siberia.

Tree ring studies have been used to develop a global history of drought going back two thousand years.

Archaeologists have digitally mapped the theatre district at Nea Paphos, the capital of the Roman province of Cyprus.

Who doesn’t enjoy news about sabre tooth cats? New evidence has been unearthed at Schoningen in Germany of how ancient peoples used the remains of these cats for weapons.

New studies on the aqueducts of ancient Rome are offering some solid numbers for how much water regularly flowed into the city.

The biggest news – so far as I’m concerned, at least – is of the discovery of a Roman amphitheatre in Volterra, northern Italy.

From the Smithsonian:

In a strange bit of genetic engineering, Vincent Van Gogh’s ear has been recreated from his DNA using a 3D printer. Yeah. I admit I’m a little creeped out by that too.

Residue from ancient pots suggest that people were using honey as far back as 8,500 years ago.

From The New York Times:

Sarah Parcak is to be awarded the $1million TED prize so that she may further her research into satellite tracking of looted archaeological sites.

The Roundup #13

The Rugby World Cup 2015 started on Friday and, apart from rather predictable wins by England and New Zealand, and an unfortunately predictable loss by Canada, the rugby world rose to its feet as Japan beat the historically dominant South African Springboks in the dying seconds of their match. Pretty incredible. The tournament is on!

In the meantime, I suppose I can post a few things about the archaeological and academic work being done around the world. Nothing so endearing as the British Museum posting items from the country of each team as they play, but still fun. So here we go!

From Archaeology.org:

The remains of a Medieval knight who liked to joust have been found in Hereford. Hard not to think of Paul Bettany as Chaucer in moments like this.

The power of stories remains ever intoxicating as evidence that Australian aboriginal groups’ stories describe how the landscape changed 7,000 years ago is published.

The remains of a Roman village have been discovered in Frankfurt, following research done to analyze the military fort there that was dismantled when the army was redeployed to the Rhine frontier.

A little girl – or, at least, one of her finger bones – is teaching us about the Denisovians and the extent of their existence as a distinct group.

Poland’s oldest known stone wall has been discovered in the country’s Carpathian region.

Some delightfully enigmatic pyramid structures are being excavated in the Sudan.

 

From ITV:

If this turns out to be a valid find, the songbook of Anne Boleyn is a remarkable window into the world of one of the most famous queens in English history.

 

From the Smithsonian:

A meal I would love to attend, historians have recreated feasts of the Hittites from 4,000 years ago to better understand the nuances of their culture.

 

From Biblical Archaeology:

A feature piece on the oldest known evidence of the House of David in Israel.

Another feature on the Edomite stronghold of Sela. I love the word ‘stronghold’.

And a final piece on the expulsion of the Hyksos.