The Roundup #77

While certain US Presidents carry on trying to take us back to the Stone Age in the derogatory sense, it’s good to know there are finds being unearthed around the world to reinforce the complexity of human civilization and our relationship to it. Here’s this week’s roundup. Enjoy!

From Archaeology.org:

Genetic testing on five individuals from Rapa Nui (also known as Easter Island) suggest that the islanders had contact with native peoples from South America earlier than previously believed.

Sweden’s violent history is growing more intriguing with the discovery of gold coins minted during the reign of Roman Emperor Valentinian III on an island off the country’s south coast.

Textiles from another site in Sweden suggest that the Vikings’ burial practices were influenced by interactions with the Arab world.

If you’ve never heard of Luwian, go look it up. This translation, and its accompanying reference to the Sea Peoples, could be game-changing.

More DNA evidence points to a strange conclusion; that the Beothuk peoples of Newfoundland and Labrador were not related to any of the other First Nations in the area. The full article in The Globe and Mail can be found here.

From the Smithsonian:

Painting over history is nothing new, as this restored painting from the 17th century shows.

The canoe dredged up during the catastrophic hurricane season this year dates to between 1640 and 1680, according to recent tests.

From the CBC:

As the water levels of the Thompson River in BC continue to drop, pre-contact artifacts are being discovered all along its banks.

Critically rare Ojibway ponies are preparing for the auction block in Manitoba.

From the University of Victoria:

A legendary settlement on the coast of BC has likely been identified by archaeologists from the Hakai Institute and the University of Victoria.

From Archaeology UK:

Well preserved evidence from a broch in Scotland may shed light on an Iron Age destruction event.

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The Roundup #56

I’ve spent the weekend reorganizing the furniture in my house so that it works a little better and feels new and fresh, enjoying the new OK Go music video, and generally avoiding the post-truth era as much as possible.

As such, this week’s roundup is rather scant. Here goes. Enjoy!

From Archaeology.org:

Petroglyphs in Jordan are yielding intriguing information on nomadic peoples in the area thousands of years ago.

From The Guardian:

Intrepid researchers have discovered that Donald Trump’s grandfather was banished from Germany in the early part of the 20th century. Because of course.

From the Economist (just because):

Statistical evidence that the All Blacks are perhaps the most dominant rugby team ever.

From The New York Times:

Recent evidence suggests that one of the first recorded caesarean sections successfully performed was in Prague in 1337.

From JSTOR:

A feature on remembering Wounded Knee. If you don’t know what this is, read Dee Brown’s 1970 book, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, and you’ll never have to ask again.

The Roundup #43

It’s been a crazy week in North America. A hate crime perpetrated in Orlando, Florida followed by a 15 hour long filibuster in the US Senate to demand better gun control laws; a suspected shooter at the University of Toronto St. George campus on the Monday morning following; the suspended disqualification of the Russian national football team at the UEFA championship; and the actual disqualification of the Russian track and field team from the Rio 2016 Summer Olympics.

I bet everyone’s in the mood to read something else, anything else. So here’s this week’s roundup! Enjoy!

From History Today:

A feature on Aristotle by Edith Hall.

A piece on the Holy Lance, the source of the final mark of the stigmata, and another of those relics that inspire confidence at all costs.

From the Smithsonian:

Excavations are underway at Piraeus, the port of Athens, at the sites of the three military harbours that were active around the time of the Persian Wars in the early 5th century BC.

From Archaeology.org:

What is now being called the Gaulcross Hoard of silver artefacts has been discovered in a farmer’s field in Scotland where, nearly 200 years earlier, other silver artefacts had already been found.

The ongoing battle against illegal or illicit antiquities trading continues, this time in Israel with the Israel Antiquities Authority.

My love of neolithic figurines continues with the rediscovery of this little gem, the Skara Brae Buddo, first discovered in the 1860s in the Orkneys and lost to museum storage until recently.

A rather large hunk of butter has been unearthed from a bog in Ireland.

The paintings at the cave site in Chauvet appear to be older than originally believed, by a few thousand years.

The site of the Bear River Massacre has been identified in Idaho where, in 1863, Americans shot and killed hundreds of Northwestern Shoshone.

Some rather fascinating bronze arrows and quivers have been found at a site in Oman, and archaeologists suggest that they may have been offerings to a god of war.

Conservators have begun restoring the solar boat discovered in the Great Pyramid of Khufu in 1954.

And ongoing work in southern Russia has yielded remarkably finely crafted gold artefacts in what was originally thought to be a routine excavation of a kurgan.

The Roundup #40

Not much going on this week, or rather not much getting reported on. But that could have a wide variety of reasons, none of which have anything to do with the fact that the Toronto Raptors just made it to the Eastern Conference Finals (no, seriously, it didn’t).

Enough beating about the bush. Here’s this week’s roundup. Enjoy!

From Archaeology.org:

The Muscogee Creek people of Florida are working to restore their cultural traditions to their lives.

Evidence of female human sacrifice from Peru further indicates the ‘great cultural upheaval’ that was going on at the time.

Possibly the world’s oldest axe has been discovered in Australia.

A New Jersey family may have found the site where Washington and his troops camped after crossing the Delaware during the American Revolutionary War.

And a small Egyptian sarcophagus from the 6th century BC contains the remains of a fetus approximately 18 weeks old.

From the Guardian:

From artefacts discovered in a sink hole in Florida, archaeologists are reexamining the history of native peoples in Pre-Columbian America.

The Roundup #38

Sports are a nice distraction from the wonky weather in Toronto. If we ever get to a point where I don’t have to wear a coat for two days in a row without freezing, I will feel it is a New World.

In the meantime, here’s this week’s roundup. Enjoy!

From Archaeology.org:

A cache of Roman coins weighing 1,300 lbs from the fourth century has been discovered in Spain.

Underwater archaeology has a new friend, OceanOne, a humanoid robot designed to explore underwater sites with more precision than other bots.

I’m always fascinated by Venus figures, mostly the much older kind, but this Roman pseudo-venus found in England still holds sway.

Construction work in Amsterdam has uncovered a 19th century slum bordering the city’s Jewish quarter.

A feature on the Hudson-Meng Bison Kill site in Nebraska.

From National Geographic:

Excavations at Jerusalem have uncovered building remains from the Hellenistic Period.

From History Today:

A feature on the correspondent from The Times, George Steer, who witnessed the bombing of Guernica in 1937.