Tag Archives: Dinosaurs

The Roundup #58

Everyone lost their minds this week, and with good reason, when a feathered dinosaur tail complete with a few vertebrae was discovered encased in amber in Myanmar. The CBC and The Economist were two such sites that picked up on this story. There was also the remarkable Twitter spat between a (clearly uneducated) member of UKIP and Cambridge Professor of Classics Mary Beard, although the outrage was limited to the tweets from the UKIP dude. Professor Beard engages angry people on Twitter with a grace and consideration that I certainly wouldn’t have the fortitude for. Kudos!

Otherwise, without further ado, here’s this week’s roundup. Enjoy!

From Archaeology.org:

Evidence of malaria in the remains of people from Italy has been confirmed by geneticists at McMaster University in Canada.

‘Tis the season for reporting on diseases, it seems. Evidence from pots from an Iron Age fort in Germany suggest a hemorrhagic fever was present in the population in the last half of the first millenium BCE.

Facial reconstruction from the skull of Robert the Bruce offers us a glimpse of what the Medieval Scottish king may have looked like.

From the Smithsonian:

A two thousand year old pet cemetery has been discovered in Egypt. Stephen King and Molly aka The Thing of Evil would be pleased.

From the CBC:

Further evidence regarding the doomed Franklin Expedition suggests that low zinc levels may have exacerbated low immune function that contributed to the deaths of the crew of the HMS Erebus and Terror.

From the Guardian:

Shellfish from which the famed Tyrian purple was drawn appear to have vanished from the eastern Mediterranean, a likely result of rising ocean temperatures and loss of habitat.

The Roundup #24

Here’s my attempt to get back into the regular routine of posting once a week. So here’s this week’s roundup.

From Archaeology.org:

Westminster Abbey in London, England has an extensive and mighty history. In December, evidence of the removal of bones from the site before construction began are being catalogued and studied to give archaeologists a better idea of what life was like in the area around about the turn of the first millenium.

Paintings from the Chauvet-Pont-D’Arc caves in France have some scientists thinking that the ancient peoples who created these magnificent works of art also depicted the oldest known artistic representation of a volcanic eruption.

Scientists are creating 3-D images of rock art from the Italian Alps dating from the Iron Age and the early Neolithic period.

The 2012 discovery of a mammoth carcass in the Eurasian Arctic suggests that humans were hunting in that region 10,000 years earlier than previously thought.

While searching for the missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 in the Indian Ocean, Australia’s Joint Agency Coordination Centre have identified a 19th century shipwreck.

The burial site of Han Emperor Jing Di has revealed the oldest evidence for tea, and in China no less.

Italian and Russian archaeologists have identified Nubian inscriptions at a temple site in the Sudan, offering new information on the relations between these peoples and the ancient Egyptians in the area.

Archaeologists have discovered the best preserved Bronze Age village ever found in England. NPR has a feature on it here.

A 2,200 year old prosthetic has been discovered at a burial site in western China.

The only ninth-tenth century artefact found underwater in Poland has turned out to be a wicker fish trap, with the remains of over 4,000 fish in Lake Lednica.

 

From The Guardian:

The largest – and as yet unnamed – dinosaur ever found, part of a subset of sauropods called titanosaurs, is now on display at the American Museum of Natural History.

 

From Biblical Archaeology:

I may have already posted this but, here goes: archaeologists working in Turkey have discovered Pluto’s Gates at Hierapolis, said to be a gateway to the underworld.

The Roundup #4

What a week this has been. We lost Omar Sharif and Roger Rees, the 2015 PanAm Games got underway in Toronto, Champagne was made part of UNESCO World Heritage, and we received the best pictures yet from the New Horizons satellite on its way to Pluto. Here’s all the things that happened before that we’re just finding out about again:

From Archaeology.org:

A beautiful series of fresco fragments have been discovered in Arles, France, the first such pieces to be found outside Italy.

The bones of 27 US Marines will finally be laid to rest more than 70 years after they died during the Battle of Tarawa in the Pacific during World War II.

The dates for prehistoric man in Scotland have been extended back to 8,000 years, approximately a thousand years earlier than previous evidence had suggested.

A Viking longhouse has been found in Reikjavic, Iceland, to the excitement of archaeologists everywhere.

A new theory about the attic of the Parthenon in Athens has been released, suggesting that the wealth of nations was once stored there.

Analysis of ice core samples from Greenland and Antarctica suggest that a pair of volcanic eruptions may have been responsible for widespread disease and famine in the sixth century, rewriting climate history in Europe for this period. This has also been covered by the Smithsonian.

Archaeologists have unearthed gold spirals in Zealand (in Denmark, not in the Pacific), which had multiple uses and are generally quite lovely to look at.

At the site of Oinoanda in Turkey, a massive stone inscription by Diogenes, who was a student of the Epicurean school of philosophical thought, was discovered towards the end of the 19th century and is part of a new study of the area. Included in the text is the following excerpt:

Not least for those who are called foreigners, for they are not foreigners. For, while the various segments of the Earth give different people a different country, the whole compass of this world gives all people a single country, the entire Earth, and a single home, the world.  

And excavations of the permanent HQ of the Sixth Legion are underway in Israel.

From Biblical Archaeology:

Yet more discussion on whether or not Carthaginians practiced human sacrifice of infants.

The discussion also continues on who built the Cardo in Jerusalem, the two main suspects being the Roman Emperors Hadrian and Justinian I.

And an oil lamp workshop has been discovered in the Galilee.

In Popular Archaeology:

A Roman legionary’s bootprint has been discovered, also in the Galilee in Israel.

And from JSTOR Daily:

New evidence about the colour of dinosaur eggs.