The Roundup #35

And (mostly) on time no less! Here’s this week’s roundup of archaeological fascinations throughout the English-reporting world. Enjoy!

From The Guardian:

The Guardian has published a guide to the destruction suffered by the ancient city of Palmyra between last year when Daesh/ISIL/ISIS took it over and it’s return to the hands of Syrian forces this March.

The ongoing search for the route Hannibal took through the Alps in his assault on Italy in 218/217BCE continues, with researchers from York University analyzing mud for the remains of animal excrement that would identify at least whether the elephants were there. Archaeology.org has also reported on this.

From Archaeology.org:

Caesar may be a fascination of history, but we mustn’t forget that he was also a mass murder. Evidence uncovered by Dutch archaeologists point to one such massacre during Caesar’s time in Gaul in the 50s BCE.

Some extremely well preserved curse tablets from the Piraeus Museum are currently being studied.

From the Smithsonian:

Evidence from Israel suggests that neolithic peoples in the area were strip miners. There’s been a fair amount of archaeological work coming out of Israel about this time period of late.

And from Biblical Archaeology:

More on the study of the name Ba’al in Biblical literature and its disappearance in the 11th or 10th century BCE. Ba’al was a storm god of the Canaanites, Tyrians, and Carthaginians, and the name of our favourite general of the ancient world, Hannibal, means ‘beloved of Ba’al’.

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