The Roundup #29

Appallingly belated, I know, but it’s something that I seem to do once in a while. Switchin’ it up, ‘n shit, eh? So here’s last week’s roundup!

From Archaeology.org:

Three late Roman tombs have been discovered in Bulgaria’s Valley of the Thracian Kings (so called to distinguish it from Egypt’s Valley of the Kings, I presume.

The need to regularly cleaning your pots is not a new thing; however, evidence from Japan shows it wasn’t practiced with the same hypochondriac-style fervour as it is now.

In Egypt, you do get rewarded for your work, as the recently discovered tomb of Senusret I’s stamp bearer attests.

I am endlessly fascinated by very, very old figurines, such as this carving of a woman from 15th to 13th century BCE Canaan. There is something awe-inspiring about the eternal desire in human beings to recreate or represent themselves.

More intriguing finds from Yorkshire, this time a mesolithic pendant in shale.

And a birchbark letter from the 14th or 15th century has been found at a site near the Kremlin in Moscow.

From the British Museum:

The Watlington Hoard from 870 AD has been declared treasure under the Treasure Act of 1996.

From Oregon State University:

What is considered a near-perfect blue pigment, long the desire of peoples throughout history, has been licensed by chemists at the university to be used to colour plastics and other manufactured items. Among other things, the colour is so stable that it does not fade in oil or water.

From Doha News:

Workers excavating areas for the Qatar 2022 World Cup stadium have unearthed stones that are 20-30 million years old.

From Biblical Archaeology:

More on ancient figurines, this feature discusses the enigmatic Judaean pillar figurines originally discovered at sites from ancient Judah more than a century ago.

And a hiker in the Galilee accidentally discovered an Egyptian scarab that is 3,500 years old.

 

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