The Roundup #23

Vanishing. Right. That.

Happy New Year! Here’s what I saw in the first week of 2016 to whet the archaeological appetite.

From Archaeology.org:

Evidence of the elusive Egyptian Blue has been discovered on a collection of mummy portraits from the second century AD.

Archaeologists have discovered evidence of the remains of several whaling ships lost in Alaska during a disastrous season in 1871 when more than thirty ships were lost and their crew (including women and children) had to walk over the ice to safety. The Smithsonian has also covered this particular discovery.

The tomb of Khentkaus III, a previously unknown Egyptian queen from the 5th Dynasty, has been discovered near the pyramid complex of Pharaoh Neferefre in Abusir.

From the Smithsonian:

While excavating space for a new hotel in Alexandria, Virginia, construction workers have uncovered the remains of a Revolutionary-era ship in the mud of the Potomac River.

From the Guardian:

Every ten to fifteen years, the Canal Saint-Martin in Paris is dredged and cleaned, and the neighbours come out for the show: invariably a wide variety of detritus comes to light, and this year is no exception.

“What have the Romans ever done for us?” Monty Python may have made the phrase memorable, but it’s a going concern for archaeologists, historians, sociologists, and psychologists. Every few years, the issue of hygiene and cleanliness bubbles to the surface of the discussion, as is covered here.

And finally, from the CBC, and a story rather close to home, geographically:

A fire destroyed a major heritage building on Jarvis Street in Toronto that was once owned by the Sheard family, notably including Toronto’s First Chief Medical Examiner, a 19th century Mayor of Toronto, and several architects. The cause of the fire has yet to be determined.

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