The Roundup #18

Ahh what a glorious (goriest?) day for the final match of the Rugby World Cup! The second half has just started and, as I watch the battery on my laptop tick down, I’m looking through the week’s archaeological news and thought now would be a good time for my latest roundup. In between laughing over Nigel Owens’ fury over players doing “silly nonsense”, of course.

Here we go…

The biggest news of the week has got to be the discovery of the Griffin Warrior in Greece, a Bronze Age burial untouched for centuries.

And I love this story about garbage – specifically discarded cigarette butts outside pubs – and how, ultimately, all archaeological work is the study of garbage.

From History Today:

As we watch ISIS/ISIL cut a swath of destruction through the Middle East and beyond, the loss of Palmyra is hardly the only archaeological travesty. Yemen – the Biblical kingdom of Sheba – is suffering right alongside Syria, and its sites are at just as much risk.

From Archaeology.org:

The ongoing back-and-forth over human impact on the environment continues, with this latest argument that indigenous peoples along the Amazon river had little impact on the natural waterway, despite living in dense settlements.

A neolithic settlement has been discovered on Anglesey, off the coast of Wales, during the construction of a new school.

A feature on one of the biggest jigsaw puzzles in the world, as fragments found on the Akropolis in Athens are catalogued and scrutinized and scrutinized some more.

Bath never ceases to be a centre of civilization as an intact 18th century clay pipe kiln has been uncovered there.

The Buffalo Soldier case gets a feature as the issue of antiquities looting is back in the news. Not the Bob Marley song, the Buffalo Soldiers’ regiment was formed shortly after the end of the Civil War as the first US Army regiment composed entirely of African Americans. They were called Buffalo Soldiers by the Native Americans who met them.

From the Smithsonian:

The study of prehistoric animals continue, particularly in Siberia, with the discovery of not only Yuka the baby wooly mammoth but also cave lions (not nearly as cute as I’m sure everyone is now thinking they were).

From the Long Now:

Oral history is a powerful thing, as evidence from Australia shows. Aboriginal groups have oral stories that go back 10,000 years to describe changing sea levels and landscape changes over thousands of years.

Advertisements