The Roundup #11

Another slightly late post, due entirely to the fact that there was art to consider, people to meet, and beer to be drunk on a Saturday night in Toronto.

It was sad to be greeted this morning with news of the death of Dr. Oliver Sacks. This preeminent neurologist and writer seems to have been unique among men in that he took great joy in his life, in all aspects of it. Such delight will be missed, no doubt.

News also of the ongoing humanitarian crisis as people migrating to Europe from Syria, the Middle East, and Africa reminds me of the human migrations of the last two thousand years, particularly the migration across what is now Switzerland that offered Caesar an unmissable opportunity for political advancement.

My personal favourite from this week’s news has to be this beautiful, enigmatic mask from Alaska, a face with both human and walrus attributes.

And now, for this week’s roundup:

In History Online:

Helen Roche offers an interesting theory about the origins of the animosity between Germany and Greece.

From Archaeology.org:

The use of Egyptian blue paint has been discovered on Roman-era funerary portraits. More on what is considered the world’s oldest artificial pigment here.

All the modern amenities: specific sleeping areas and a hearth space that may have been used to heat water have been discovered for the first time at a Neanderthal site in Spain.

Jeffrey Schwartz of the University of Pittsburgh is proposing that researchers develop a new morphology for classifying hominids.

A Polish Soviet World War II plane has been discovered in Bzura Lake following record heat and a lack of rainfall in the region. Attempts to identify the plane and its unfortunately pilot are ongoing.

More Linear B tablets from this remarkable find – a Mycenaean palace complex in Laconia.

And a mysterious collection of ice age lion and bear bones have been discovered in a cave in Russia.

From The Walrus:

Alexander Tesar takes us into the world of the Archaeological Services Inc based in Toronto and Burlington, Ontario.

From the office of the Mayor of Chicago:

Three Japanese sliding door panels have been rediscovered in a storage facility. Originally displayed during the 1893 World’s Fair, these panels will undergo conservation efforts while the local government determines their fate as part of Chicago’s rich heritage.

From Biblical Archaeology:

The House of Peter in Capernaum where Jesus lived during the early part of his ministrations may have been discovered under a Byzantine church.

And a feature on the great temple of Megiddo and urban culture in the Levant.

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