The Roundup #7

What a find! The oldest known Roman fortifications, and the only ones ever discovered in Italy, have been identified near Trieste.

Archaeology Magazine does a slightly more in-depth piece on Carnuntum in Austria, a Roman fort along the Danube that became a thriving city until it was abandoned in the 5th century CE. Among other things, evidence of a gladiatorial school has been discovered there and archaeological work is ongoing.

And a bizarre site where excavators have found bison bones buried deep in the earth has University of Lethbridge archaeologists scratching their heads.

Here’s this week’s roundup, albeit a day later than usual:

In Archaeology.org:

Proof that, when it comes to archaeology, details are everything, archaeologists at Tel-Kabri are examining recently excavated jars, some of which used to contain an aromatic red wine.

The oldest known Pictish fort has been identified in Dunnicaer by archaeologists from the University of Aberdeen in Scotland.

Preliminary surveys of the site of the Great Synagogue of Vilna in Lithuania have led to discussion about excavations in coming seasons.

Potentially the oldest human remains yet found in France, a human tooth has been discovered during excavations in Arago Cave in the southwestern part of the country.

And your bit of cuteness for the week, cat paw prints have been discovered on Roman roof tiles from England.

From PastHorizons:

A Roman military bath complex has been discovered in Georgia, complete with decorative mosaics. Luxury flooring for army men? This is something I’ll keep tabs on…

From the Smithsonian:

The Jamestown Rediscovery has another medal for its mantlepiece: the identities of four of the senior members of the original 17th century colony.

From The Guardian:

A Russian submarine has been discovered off the coast of Sweden. Although it’s still unclear how old the sub actually is, one this is certain: we won’t find Sean Connery in it.

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