The Roundup #1

In my first attempt at a regular posted series, and because I’ve now had a least two people tell me how much they enjoy the archaeology articles that I regularly post on Facebook, here is my first Roundup for the week of June 15th to 19th, 2015.

My favourite of the week has got to be the Spartan invasion of the London Underground.

From the Telegraph UK:

Our hopes that Palymra had avoided the destruction wrought by ISIS/ISIL on Nimrud and Hatra have been dashed…to pieces.

From the Smithsonian:

Following the filming of a documentary for PBS, Providence Pictures donated a most interesting contraption to the Colosseum in Rome, complete with revealing wolf!

Despite at least once notable typo, the Smithsonian delves into the world of Proto-Indo-European and show how a single ancient language group affects billions of people worldwide.

Arsonists have destroyed artefacts from the site of Tel Kishon in Israel. Yes, fire still wrecks things, even old things.

And a stunning, creative endeavour by two documentarians from China at the site where the Buddha statues in Bamiyan were destroyed by the Taliban in 2001.

From Archaeology.org:

Gladiators etched in stone from the ancient Greek city of Aphrodisias. I’m such a sucker for gladiatorial imagery.

Bulgarian officials have confiscated a series of silver coins, some bearing the image of King Philip II of Macedon (father of Alexander the Great) at Sofia International Airport. Well done, Bulgaria!

Evidence of the Biblical king Eshba’al is discovered on a 3,000 year old jar in the Valley of Elah.

Dog mummies abound in the catacombs of Saqqara near the temple of Anubis.

And JSTOR Daily’s latest:

The forgotten pyramids of Sudan.

 

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